In today’s blog, we’re going to go over scene transitions in Doodly. We will also look at some examples of the best objects to use for each transition.

Scene transition is a video effect that occurs before a scene switches to the next scene. It is the period between two consecutive scenes which helps maintain the continuity of your video. In Doodly, we can find the transition settings in 2 locations: the Video Settings and the Scene Settings.

By default, your video is set with a swipe-left transition but you can always change that if you wish to. You can use either JPEG, PNG, or SVG files for your images. You can also use GIF files to add more animation to your scenes.

Let’s first take a look at the different types of scene transition found within Video Settings.

Scene transition – Video Settings

Scene transition from Video Settings is applied across the entire video. If you set your transition to e.g. swipe-right, all the scenes within your video will have that transition.

There are 7 scene transitions within Video Settings and these are: 

  • None
  • Swipe left
  • Swipe right 
  • Swipe up
  • Swipe down 
  • Swipe mixed
  • Camera panning

Let’s look at each transition in action and see sample objects that best work with each.

1. NONE

As the name implies, this transition means that there is no transition between the scenes. The new scene just appears immediately. This is ideal for formal presentations such as sales decks, business proposals, meeting presentations, or videos where you wish to just have a quick, unnoticeable transition between each scene, like a comic skit, etc. This is somewhat similar to what we see in movies and tv productions where switching from one frame to the next is seamless because there’s no transition effect applied. This transition is simple but it gives a straightforward, clean scene transition.

Here are some examples:

This is a business deck sample. Since we needed animation on the succeeding scenes, we used Doodly to create the presentation. We can create formal type videos in Doodly and get creative by using a different background color, importing small assets to accentuate the video, adding charts and animations.

With our second example, we added a dog on a leash with his pet bowl and behind him is a dog house. The assets we used here are all found within Doodly. Notice how it transitions immediately to a blank scene without any transition effect applied.

With our third example, we used a comic skit and the transition is also set to “None”. Notice the soft fade in motion as the scene enters. We achieved this by changing the reveal mode to Fade and setting the animation duration to 3 seconds.

2. SWIPE LEFT

Swipe left means that the original scene swipes away moving to the left and revealing a blank slate. Or, if you have any assets set to appear instantly, it will reveal those assets immediately right after the previous scene swipes to the left. Swipe left looks great for objects like cars, running cats and dogs, skating, etc. as it gives the effect of an object really moving and leaving your scene.

We imported a GIF file of a car and applied the swipe-left effect. To achieve the same effect as above, we have to give our GIF image a time to do the action it’s supposed to do. We can make this happen by adding extra time at the end of your scene. By default, the time at the end of each scene is set to .05 seconds. We can set this to 4 seconds giving our car enough time to move before the swipe left transition takes effect.

Here’s our next example:

The same setting is applied to our cute doggie showing his skating moves.

See how this little boy and his pet bunny run so fast. These images are both PNG files imported to Doodly.

3. SWIPE RIGHT

With swipe right, the original scene swipes away moving to the right and revealing a blank slate or any of those assets that you have set to appear instantly.

This is perfect for moves such as running. See how these runners compete with each other and run so fast.

Here we have a GIF file of a horse running.

We can also use the swipe right transition to show a moving arrow. To make it more animated, we used a GIF file. To achieve the above scene, we maximized the image so it covers the entire scene.

You would also want to match the color of your background to the color of the image that you’re using. To get the exact color, you can either choose it from the custom background color picker from the scene setting’s background style menu or upload your actual GIF image as a custom image then select portions of it as your background. This then becomes the background color of your scene.

4. SWIPE UP

With the swipe-up transition, the original scene swipes upwards and it reveals the blank slate or any of the assets that you have set to appear instantly. This transition is ideal for objects that are expected to move up such as balloons.

With this image, we imported 2 hot air balloons. With the first image, we disabled the hand drawing by setting the Reveal mode to Fade, and with the 2nd hot air balloon, we have the Reveal mode set to Draw.

With our next example, we used another obvious object that goes up and these are the lovely balloons we used to see at birthdays parties. They are great objects to use for our swipe-up transition.

And of course, look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s… Superman! Superman definitely looks good in a swipe-up transition.

5. SWIPE DOWN

Our next transition is swipe-down which is the opposite of swipe-up. With swipe-down, the original scene swipes downward and reveals the blank slate or your next set of assets.

If your video has a character that is falling, a swipe-down transition will make it look like your character is indeed falling. You can be creative with the succeeding scenes like adding other objects falling too and for sure it’s going to be a hit.

Here we have a GIF file of a flaming meteor rock and it is falling.

Lastly, a diver diving off with bubbles around her looks great on a swipe-down transition. With the above sample, we used a PNG file for the diver and uploaded the bubbles separately which is a GIF file.

6. SWAP MIXED

Choosing this transition applies a random mix of transitions to your presentation. You can have a combination of swipe left, swipe right, swipe up, and swipe down.

7. CAMERA PANNING

This transition means that the camera moves to a blank section whiteboard on which you can see a portion of the original drawing in the new scene. If you choose this option, be aware of how you place your assets as you may not like which portions are shown. For example, if you expand an asset, it looks great on your scene alone but if camera panning is selected as your transition, your image sometimes will look strange. Note that this setting can only be applied in the video sections of Doodly.

To make an asset appear on the next scene when the camera pans, it would take several trials and errors to position it to the right location. If you wish to really use a pan and zoom effect, you may want to read about our pan and zoom feature and learn about it.

With our example for the camera panning transition, we used small and simple assets so we can easily work on our scenes and show how the panning works.

Below are the assets we used per scene. Take note of how they are positioned in each scene.

Here’s how our video looks like using the camera panning transition:

Note that this type of transition is applied to the entire video. If you wish to have a different transition per scene, we can do this by changing the exit animation of each scene within Scene Settings.

Exit Animation – Scene Settings

Exit animation within Scene Settings allows us to change the transition of each individual scene.

Scene Setting’s exit animation has 6 transitions and these are the following:

  • None
  • Swipe left
  • Swipe right 
  • Swipe up
  • Swipe down 
  • Erase
  • The first five on the list are also found within the video settings while Erase transition is only found within the Scene Settings.

    As we already know, changing your scene’s transition within scene settings only affects your selected scene. While you may initially have the video set to swipe left between every scene, you can change your transition as desired.

    The first five transitions above work the same as the transitions within Video Settings so this time, we will only look at scenes that have Erase transition. 

    Erase

    With erase transition, after your assets are revealed, a hand with an eraser appears and erases everything in your scene then it transitions to your next scene.

    Our first sample is a cartoon image of a girl that is being drawn and erased after. This asset is an SVG file and is available within Doodly.

    With our 2nd sample, we see a hand writing on a green board. This scene best fits the erase transition as we really use an eraser to erase chalk writings on a chalkboard.

    With our last sample scene, we used a rain GIF file that is drawn on a glass board. Well, we can’t really erase rain in real life but it looks satisfying to see those little raindrops being wiped out by an eraser. You can use any of the mentioned transitions to whichever assets you wish to use.

    And there you have it, our scene samples for each transition within Doodly. We’re pretty sure there’s still a lot of great ideas and objects that you can use with each transition. It’s fun to play around with assets and transitions so don’t limit yourself to the samples mentioned here. Having said that, let’s have a quick recap of the things we just covered.

    Quick Recap

    Let’s not forget, a scene transition selected within Video Settings is applied across your entire video. To add different transitions per scene, we go to Scene settings and select from the available exit animation.

    We have a total of 8 transitions in Doodly that you can use for your scenes: 

    1. None

    2. Swipe left

    3. Swipe right

    4. Swipe up 

    5. Swipe down 

    6. Swipe mixed 

    7. Camera panning

    8. Erase

    Transitions None, Swipe left, Swipe right, Swipe up and Swipe down are available within Video and Scene Settings.

    Swipe mixed and camera panning are only found within Video settings while the Erase transition is only found within Scene Settings. 

    You can import JPEG, PNG, SVG, and GIF files in Doodly. GIF adds more animation to your scenes.

    To make sure your scene displays your GIF’s action, we extend the scene’s extra time in the end.

    When it comes to the assets, there are tons of royalty-free images on the internet, one of them is https://pixabay.com/. You can download an image from there or any other resources and import it in Doodly.

    Just a Reminder…

    Having an asset that does the exact transition action certainly adds up animation to your video but also, just because an object doesn’t do actions such as falling, going up or down, moving left or right, doesn’t mean you can no longer use the transitions on them. Note that transition is a way to break each scene. Think of it as a very quick advertisement, adding more movement to your video and giving your audience a quick break from the previous scene presented. You can definitely use these transitions to whatever assets you have in your scenes and just have fun with it. Give it a try and start using these transitions in your videos in case you have not used them yet. 🙂